“Reconciliation has two sides: It is fascinating and terrifying at the same time. It draws us in so that we desire it: within ourselves, with one another, and between our different confessional traditions. We see the price and it scares us. For reconciliation means renouncing our desire for power and recognition. In Christ God graciously reconciles us to himself even though we have turned away from him. God’s action goes beyond even this: God reconciles not only humanity, but the whole of creation to himself.

In the Old Testament God was faithful and merciful to the people of Israel with whom he established a covenant. This covenant remains ‘the gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable’ (Rom 11:29). Jesus, who inaugurated the new covenant with his blood, was a son of Israel. Too often in history our churches have failed to honor this […] all churches are called to bring forth reconciliation in their communities and resist all forms of discrimination, for we are all part of God’s creation.

May the wellspring of God’s gracious reconciliation overflow in this year’s Week of Prayer, so that many people may find peace, and so that bridges may be built. May people and churches be compelled by the love of Christ to live reconciled lives and to break down the walls that divide ”

http://www.oikoumene.org/en/resources/documents/commissions/faith-and-order/xi-week-of-prayer-for-christian-unity/2017/2017

Deacon Joyce Locht